Having at least a rudimentary ability to cook and prepare meals from whole foods (or having someone who does it for you 🙂 ) is a crucial adjunct to healthy eating. It’s not impossible to eat healthy meals consistently without cooking but far more difficult. My son Benjamin has spent this year honing his cooking skills. He prepares    dinner for about seventy kids who attend an after school program with an inner city ministry called Thrive Lonsdale. He has developed a passion for preparing healthy meals on a budget which they will actually eat and even enjoy. Several months ago he told me proudly about success with his chili. In it, he was able to “hide” loads of spinach, onions, squash and peppers in addition to the usual beef, tomatoes and beans. Amazingly, the cost was less than $1.50 per child and that with many of them getting seconds. I’ll write more about preparing healthy and tasty meals on a budget in later posts.

Benjamin

Benjamin


A couple of weeks ago, Benj called me and said that he had a great idea. “I’ll come to the house once a week and give you cooking lessons. You need to start cooking again for many reasons and it will improve my teaching skills.” Then he hit me with a question. “Why did you stop cooking?” I answered half-seriously, “because I married your mother and she took over.” He replied, “Come on Dad, this is important. If cooking is as important as you say it is, we need to consider the barriers. Remembering why you stopped may bring some insight.” He was absolutely right. I love being pressed for truth by my son! More about that in the next post.